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Nearly $12 Million Spent on Buckeye Institute’s List of 10 Worst Capital Budget Projects



June 02, 2022

Columbus, Ohio – On Thursday, the Buckeye Institute unveiled its Top 10 Worst Capital Budget Projects of 2022, which total nearly $12 million. Buckeye’s review of the capital budget also revealed more than $150 million in pork barrels or community projects which should be funded by private donations or local efforts.

“After a hiatus due to the pandemic, Ohio’s pork-riddled capital budget is back, as is the Buckeye Institute’s 10 Worst Projects list. This year’s bill includes more than $150 million in spending on local projects that lawmakers could have spent on pressing state priorities or returned to taxpayers,” said Buckeye Institute researcher Greg R. Lawson. . “In an era of historically high inflation, every dollar not spent on public safety, health care, or workforce development is a wasted dollar and adds to the amount of taxes every day that Ohioans have to pay out of their wallets.”

Buckeye’s 10 Worst Capital Budget Projects of 2022

  • $2.4 million for the community pool in Lima.
  • $2 million for the Columbus Symphony Orchestra.
  • $2 million building a parking lot near Findlay Market in Cincinnati.
  • $1.5 million for the Blossom Music Center in Summit County. This is in addition to the nearly $3 million the center has received since 2016.
  • $1.25 million for the Toledo Art Museum. This is in addition to the nearly $2.65 million the museum has received since 2016.
  • $1 million for an expansion of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. This is in addition to the nearly $3.15 million the museum has received since 2016.
  • $750,000 for the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati.
  • $500,000 for the Dayton Art Institute. This is in addition to the $1.75 million the museum has received since 2016.
  • $350,000 for the Columbus Museum of Art. This is in addition to the $225,000 the museum received in the 2020 capital budget.
  • $222,000 for pickleball courts in Clermont and Warren counties.

Lawson continued, “Not only are millions of state tax dollars being spent to fund highly localized community projects, but the capital budget was introduced and passed within days with little or no opportunity for the public to learn what is in the legislation. The people of Ohio deserve more transparency from their elected officials.

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